Page 7 - The Benefits of Music Education
P. 7

Speech and Reading Ability
Reading, understanding and speaking a language requires the ability to identify where syllables and words begin and end.  is skill
is called phonological ability and uses the same areas of the brain used to identify and break up sounds.  ese are important skills that we gain through experience, and they help us understand our native language and new ones.
Studies have shown that musically-trained children have better phonological skills, which can help them to learn words faster, develop
a richer vocabulary, and learn to read sooner.
In a 2009 Canadian study, young children taking music lessons showed dramatic improvement in their verbal intelligence
scores after only four weeks of training.
 e gains from studying music were much greater than for other types of arts training.3
Improvements in speech and reading are critical to success in school, where strong literacy is a pre-requisite for nearly every subject area, including mathematics.
“ e theory of relativity occurred to me by intuition, and music is the driving force behind this intuition. My parents had me study the violin from the time I was six.
My new discovery
is the result of musical
perception.”
3. Sylvain Moreno et al, Musical Training In uences Linguistic Abilities in Eight-year-old Children: More Evidence for Brain Plasticity, Cerebral Cortex, (Volume 19, Issue 3, 2009)
4. Gottfried Schlaug,
The Brain of Musicians
– A Model for Functional and Structural Adaptation
5. Shinichi Suzuki, 1969, Nurtured by Love. A New Approach to Education, p90
RAW VOCABULARY SCORE3
20 25 30
MUSIC GROUP
before training
MUSIC GROUP
after training
VISUAL ARTS GRP
before training
VISUAL ARTS GRP
after training
Creativity
5
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL 1.800.461.6058 OR VISIT RCMUSIC.COM
               Another study found a marked di erence
in inter-hemispheric communication (communication between the right and left sides of the brain) in individuals with musical training versus those without musical training. Scientists involved in this area of study
believe the greater connectivity between brain regions may help foster increased creativity.4
Albert Einstein
April 2014 The Royal Conservatory 5































































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